Peeking at the ‘Geek’: Proud parents, Video ideas & Uncomfortable game tables

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(Geek Peeks is published every Monday.)

A Look at the best daily threads from the Board Game Geek general gaming forum.

MONDAY, JULY 14
Which Movie Would Make a Horrible Theme for a Game
submitted by 80sgamer

Not surprisingly, this made for a lively discussion. There are a lot of cheesy movies out there (see: Mystery Science Theater 3000), but I picture most of them as early Ameritrash tabletops or 8-bit video games.

The original poster brought up a great movie, Midnight Cowboy, and a good example of a potentially horrible theme. The suggestions ranged from cult films to cheese fests. A couple Terry Gilliam movies were suggested (Brazil, 12 Monkeys) as well as potential card games as far apart thematically as you could get: Lolita: The CCG and Schindler’s List: The LCG.

Check out the thread and ponder What Might Have Been.

TUESDAY, JULY 15
Proud parenting moment
submitted by Nathan D (sasigns)

The middle of the week was a time for parents to reflect proudly on their children’s gaming accomplishments. This proud papa is showing off a game his son, 12, created to play with the boy’s 5-year-old sister.

Based on Frozen, of course….

WEDNESDAY, JULY 16
Proud daddy
submitted by John F. (jjfalzone)

Back-to-back Dads. This one found his 5-year-old looking over his shoulder when he would watch video run-throughs. Seems the kid was picking up the games almost as quickly as his dad.

THURSDAY, JULY 17
Gaming tables: fun or uncomfy to play on?
submitted by Robyn Z

Yeah, they may look good in photographs, but can you actually play a game on them?

Much of the discussion centers on the age-old question: Round, or Rectangle?

FRIDAY, JULY 18
Should you edit reviews?
submitted by Christian Gienger

This is a shorter thread than it needs to be, but the basics are touched on. Many reviews are nothing more than quick first impressions. Reviewers often change their minds after a couple more plays, so the question is: should they edit their reviews, or write a new review entirely.

The sensible solution seems to be to identify the tone of the article right up front. Might I suggest 3 identifiers: First Impression, Session Report, Thoughtful Review. Without those identifiers, readers must carefully note the POV being presented and digest the article with that in mind.

SATURDAY, JULY 19
Ya know, I actually like the BGG rating system
submitted by achasteen

“Score! Unh! Good god, y’all. What is it good for? Absolutely nothin’!”
(Yes, that’s a parody of the Temptations’ song…. Let’s move on…)

Scores, the rating assigned a game by Board Game Geek members, can be useful, but only when context is provided. And the only context BGG provides is in the Ranking each game holds within its primary subcategory (Strategy, Family, etc).

C’mon… Twilight Struggle has one of the highest scores? It has a very limited – but passionate – audience. Most people looking for board game recommendations are not going to be interested in that type of game at all.

The biggest problem with BGG’s scores, then, is the lack of filtering, which would provide context. In the database, games are provided with a wealth of identifying information: Mechanic, Designer, Theme, Game Family, Number of Players, etc.

If one could filter those categories, then scores would provide a useful tool in determining which games a person should consider first when purchasing. And if scores can’t be used effectively as game recommendations, then, Good god, y’all, what are they good for…?

SUNDAY, JULY 20
Would like to start a video series – what content/topics are something you feel is lacking?
submitted by John Reynolds

Step up, readers, and tell the lad what he needs to know. My suggestion was a series of walk-throughs tailored to 8-12 year olds. They’re ready to learn, they’re eager to learn, and – gosh, darn – they’re smart enough to sit at the table with us!

I can’t read everything, so tell me in the Comments what great threads I might have missed.

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About Author

Drew is a contributor to the Board Gamers Anonymous podcast. He's a curator by nature, compulsively reading and obsessively organizing what he's read. He's also been a gamer since the age of 3, which means he's been playing board games for... let's just say more than 40 years, and leave it at that...